Body cameras and CNSF calls

Under French law, SNCF security officers are authorized to wear body cameras on an experimental basis. For more on the law, please see Section L2251-4-1 of the French Transport Code, and Deliberation 2017-289 of 16 November 2017 by the French National Data Protection Commission (CNIL). Use of the cameras is regulated under Decree No. 2016-1862 of 23 December 2016.

SNCF has a designated data protection officer, who may be reached by email at dpo-sncf@sncf.fr

We process data from the cameras for two purposes: (1) to prevent incidents when SNCF security officers need to intervene; and (2) to gather evidence of violations and prosecute perpetrators.

The legal basis for processing the data is fulfilment of a public service mission.

The data is stored for six months, starting from the date it is recorded. It is used solely by the individuals responsible for processing it in the course of their duties, and it can be released only to authorities with the legal right to access it.

We will conduct the body camera experiment from January 2018 to December 2019, on eight sites under four SNCF regional security divisions (Directions de Zone Sûreté, or DZS): Montparnasse and Juvisy (DZS Paris Rive Gauche, 17 bd de Vaugirard, 75015 Paris); Grenoble and Lyon Part-Dieu (DZS Sud-Est, 44 rue de la Villette, 69003 Lyon); Bordeaux and La Rochelle (DZS Sud-Ouest, 1 rue Charles Domercq, 33080 Bordeaux; Lille and Calais (DZS Nord, place de la gare, 59800 Lille).

All data subjects have the right, within the terms and limits of the law, to ask the data controller for access to their personal data, as well as the right to rectification and erasure, the right to restrict or oppose processing of their data, the right of portability, and the right to issue directives on the handling of their personal data after their death.

Under France’s Data Protection Act No. 78-17 of 6 January 1978, all persons have the right to access and rectify their data, and therefore anyone may exercise these rights by providing proof of identity and submitting a request to the appropriate DZS.

If you believe that processing of your data has violated the law, you have the right to submit a claim to the CNIL or to the controlling authority in the country where you ordinarily reside, where you work, or where the violation took place.

SNCF’s Security Division uses a system that records and plays back calls made to and from the French national rail security centre (Centre National de Sûreté Ferroviaire, or CNSF). SNCF has a designated data protection officer, who may be reached by email at dpo-sncf@sncf.fr

We process data from these calls for the following purposes: (1) to check whether CNSF employees are handling calls well and take corrective action as needed to improve service quality; (2) to determine whether employees of the Public Rail Group are using the CNSF call system appropriately; and (3) to preserve evidence that may be used in legal proceedings.

The legal basis for processing the data is the data controller’s legitimate interest, i.e. proper delivery and improvement of the services.

The data is stored for one month, starting from the date it is recorded. It is used solely by the individuals responsible for processing it in the course of their duties, and it can be released only to authorities with the legal right to access it.

All data subjects have the right, within the terms and limits of the law, to ask the data controller for access to their personal data, as well as the right to rectification and erasure, the right to restrict or oppose processing of their data, the right of portability, and the right to issue directives on the handling of their personal data after their death.

You may exercise your rights by providing proof of identity and contacting CNSF at: Direction de la Sûreté, Centre National de Sûreté Ferroviaire, 116 rue de Maubeuge, 75010 Paris.

If you believe that processing of your data has violated the law, you have the right to submit a claim to the CNIL or to the controlling authority in the country where you ordinarily reside, where you work, or where the violation took place.